Fake News

Who are the real hackers, and why most of the news about hackers are fake (snippet from my upcoming talk)…

By Eh’den Biber

Hi everyone

As you might have seen from my previous posts, I’ve been writing a long post called “the revolution”, which covers my journey into finding ways of communicating and connecting with my son, who have severe autism. I was about to post a new update to it – but then I stopped.

You see, in the last two years I’ve been planning to give a talk about the subject of substance abuse in the hackers’ community. This is a topic which has have HUGE implications for anyone who either is a hacker, working with a colleague who is a hacker, employing one, or planning to employ one. The reason the update to “the revolution” was delayed is because substances and their impact on non-ordinary states of consciousness was just too big for a written update.

And the good news is that thanks to it, I’m finally ready to give a talk on the subject. It would be lovely to share it with Peerlyst members, here in London, and will be looking for an event space for it. Also, I plan to share it in upcoming CONs because it’s probably the most interesting topic I’ve researched, and one with huge implications to many people who are reading it right now. Based on my experience, if you are reading it you’re either abuse substances or know a substance abuser. If you have an upcoming CON and wish me to talk on the subject, please contact me directly. I assure you that it’s going to be one of the most interesting talks you will have in your event.

Please share thoughts, comments, and stories either below or, if anonymously, via my secure email account: ehden at protonmail dot com.

 

Eh’den

Fake News

There is an epidemic of “hacker news” that dominates our world in an alarmingly increasing pace. It’s moving so fast that mentioning any reference here is a mistake because it will be blown away by another data breach so fast that the reference will most likely be forgotten.

The problem is that most of these news are fake.

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Time Capsule

“Hey Eh’den, I found two hard disks of yours”. My wife and I have been struggling with water ingress issue in our son’s bedroom, and while she was taking the opportunity un-hording (also known as “throw away shit he is still keeping”) she discovered forgotten external hard disks of mine. One of them was a mini USB drive, 500GB of information which I thought I already backed up onto my 2TB hard drive.

As I was going over the endless folders and sub-sub folders I discovered a folder called “videos”. And there I discovered old videos I took of my kids when they were young.

I played the videos to my wife. She was sitting next to me in quiet, shocked. After watching few of videos she told me “Eh’den, I now understand why you refused to accept his autism. He looked so normal as a child”.

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Men, Bicycles, Russian Girls, and Spam

 

 

 

Adventure into the male psyche that helps spammers make money.

By Eh’den Biber

This is the story of the spam email, the vulnerabilities it exploits, and the remediation actions required to it.

 

How we got here?

As was written many times in the past, the internet was never designed to be internet, it was intranet from a trust perspective – and protocols RFCs that were developed on top of it never imagined that it will run on dog collars. I kid you not.

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The Revolution

How I became part of an invisible hacking revolution.

By Eh’den Biber

Remark – In contrary to my other writings (e.g. “making privacy great again”), this is going to be an evolving story. It means that I will be continuously updating it. Also, I plan to record it as a podcast so you could listen to it rather than read it.

[Changelog]

2017-05-14 – V01 – Long Drive + The Revolution
2017-05-15 – V02 – Stealing Fire + The Guinee Pig
2017-05-15 – V03 –  Ecstasis + Lost in the Rain + The Sacred Four
2017-05-21 – V04 – Frederick + Mad Intelligence
2017-08-13 – V05 – Time Capsule

Prologue – Long drive

13 years ago, when my youngest son Rephael was three and half years old, my ex-wife and I arrived to a Belgian hospital to hear the diagnostic of his condition. After months of observations and tests the result came in, and even though I remember everything that was said, looking back I realise that at that time I had no ability to grasp their meaning: “Your son has severe autism. It will never go away, it will not improve. You will never be able to communicate with him, you will never be able to send him to a normal school. Your son will never be able to be independent, your son will need to be in a mental institute when he will grow up.

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